When visiting Members' ships, the Club's ship inspectors often observe good practices and initiatives that may be adopted on other ships.


Fire-Fighting Equipment Ready

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Breathing apparatus as part of the fire-fighting equipment (FFE) on this ship are supported by brackets secured to the bulkhead, at a height that would make donning them a quick and easy process. A plastic bag has been placed over the face mask of each apparatus to protect them.

Click on the image to enlarge.


Tank Entry Tags

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Every man who enters an enclosed space on this ship is issued with one of these tags which is secured at the entrance of the space. This is a very clear and effective visual indication as to how many men are occupying the space, if any at all. The name of the holder is also written on the tag and each man will remove their own tag as they exit the space.

Click on the image to enlarge.


Scupper Filter

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The blocking of scuppers on a ship is a nightmare. This ship has reduced that risk by fitting restrainer bars made by the crew. The device fits into the scupper hole and is ideal for use when the ship is in port (not suitable during bunkering operations). The Club recommends that these be coated in high-vis paint to reduce the risk of trip and falls. Click on the image to enlarge.


Number of days without an incident

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This board found on a member ship updates daily with the number of days the ship has been trading without lost time due to crew injury. This particular ship has been running for 2,237 days without crew injury causing lost time, which equates to over six years!

This inexpensive initiative is good for encouraging crew to work safely and see the number rise. Target figures and awards may help improve the safety culture onboard. A simple display can be made on board, with the date and number of days updated with a dry-wipe marker. Click on the image to enlarge.


Dust Covers - Bulk cargo operations

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Loading dusty cargoes in bulk is a messy business and the ship gets covered in dust. This is not only an external problem and a hazard to those working on deck, but the dust also makes its way into the accommodation. The situation is made worse when the loading spouts are not corectly positioned and are too high as in the first picture below.

The second picture shows a ship loading grain at a terminal, where the staff there made an effort to reduce the grain dust by erecting protective covers over the hatch lids. This is a good innitiative which made a lot of difference, particularly in the accommodation. Click on an image to enlarge.


Reinforced Fibreglass Deck Gratings

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Steel deck gratings between container hatches are easily damaged by container lashings and susceptible to rust. This Member ship has replaced the steel gratings with maintenance free reinforced fibre glass gratings. Click on an image to enlarge.


Emergency Steering

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The instructions for engaging and operating the emergency steering onboard this ship are complemented with a series of photos, illustrating the step by step instructions. This is a good idea which may assist those who are not so familiar with the operation. This good practice can also be incorporated into instructions for the operation of the emergency generator, fire pumps and other equipment onboard.
Click on the image to enlarge.


Open Hatch Guard

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Every ship should establish procedures to eliminate risk when any of her hatches are open. The crew onboard this Member ship have constructed a frame to fit securely over the opening of access hatches onboard in order to prevent anyone from falling through the hatch. This photo is featured in one of the 2005 edition Loss Prevention Posters.

Click on an image to enlarge.


High-Visibility Escape Guides

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Emergency escape signs should be placed at low-level because signs at or above the top of doors will not be visible by someone crawling on the deck under smoke. It is a good idea to put high-visibility strips along the bottom of bulkheads to highlight corridors in the event of an emergency.

The images also demonstrate the state of visibility in a smokey environment and the advantage of using these strips. If used, it is important that the strips do not guide you past exits, which should be highlighted as demonstrated. The pictures also show how these strips could be used on stairways.

Click on an image to enlarge.


Maritime Security (Marsec) Level Indicator

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This sign was situated on each deck by the central stairwell on this Member ship. Very easy to change using a chinagraph pencil, this sign indicates to everybody onboard the security level as set by TRANSEC, based on threat information obtained from the security services. This indicates good implementation of the International Ship & Port Facility Security Code (ISPS Code) onboard this ship.

Click on the image to enlarge. 


Deck door markings

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Staircase, elevator and other doors opening into gangways provide the opportunity for a crewmember walking past the door to be hit by it when opened from the other side. The image shows how the crew on one ship have reduced this risk by painting marks on the deck. The markings remind ships staff to take care when passing, as these doors may open suddenly. This can be accompanied by a notice on the other side of the door warning crew to open slowly! Click on the image to enlarge.


Emergency Escape Aids

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The Emergency Escape Breathing Device (EEBD) is designed to be used to provide personnel breathing protection against a hazardous atmosphere while escaping to an area of safety. This member ship made a point of hanging a charging wolf lamp torch next to the set so that it could easily be located by someone having to use the breathing device.

Click on the image to enlarge.


Taped Off Working Areas

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Inspectors found that when work was undergoing on this ship, where restricted access to the area is preferred, hazard tape is erected to seal the area off. Crew have been known to relax regulations concerning barriers and notices when everybody onboard is familiar with the ship but examples like below should be encouraged. Click on an image to enlarge.


Portable SOPEP Storage

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It has been seen on some vessels that in addition to the SOPEP locker, SOPEP equipment is being stored in portable units secured on deck. The image (left) shows large units on a wheel base made onboard. Other methods seen include a set of wheelie bins labelled SOPEP and full of equipment. Storing equipment in a portable device will greatly improve the response time in an emergency that is located a distance from the SOPEP store. Click on the image to enlarge.


Retro-Reflective Door Handles

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Retro-reflective strips have been fitted around the door handles on cabin and exit doors on this passenger ship entered with the Club. The second picture shows a door without the retro-reflective strips, making the handle harder to see in smoke or darkness. Highlighting door handles is a good initiative and should be encouraged on all vessels.

Click on an image to enlarge.


Bridge Stairwell Gate

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Modern bridge design often incorporates a very steep stairwell to the bridge with the door at the bottom, leaving an open stairwell on the bridge. This is a bad design creating a high risk area. At night on the blackened bridge, or when the ship is rolling in heavy weather, this open stairwell could lead to a nasty fall.

It has been seen on some vessels that a wooden bar has been fitted to prevent someone falling down the stairwell but the inspectors were particularly keen when they saw the spring loaded gate fitted on this entered ship.

Although not restricted to the bridge stairwell, the Personal Injury claims department can report on ships' crew falling down stairwells. With the bridge being blackened at night, this can be considered a high risk area and a self closing gate a good preventative measure.

Click on an image to enlarge.


Rubber Mats Between Container Bays

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Port container lashing/unlashing personnel may be rough when handling container securing equipment. Container twist locks may get damaged when thrown down and will almost certainly always chip the deck causing increased maintenance for the small number of ships staff.
In order to reduce maintenance and damage to twist locks, this Member ship has introduced a simple and inexpensive idea of laying down old rubber mats between the container bays. Click on the images above to enlarge.


Taping Doors When Loading Grain

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On visiting a ship loading grain, one of the Club's inspectors found that the crew onboard used this system to combat the problem of cargo dust entering the accommodation. The dust clouds produced from such cargoes may present a health hazard and it is wise to prevent it from entering the accommodation block.

Most accommodation hatches/doors can be dogged-down and will provide an air-tight seal, but other doors (particularly bridge doors) may not have dogs and allow the dust particles to get through. When loading this type of cargo, the crew on this particular ship would tape the necessary doors as illustrated in the images (left).

As well as taping the doors, the crew would also ensure a good filter on accommodation block vents.

Click on an image to enlarge.


Stowaways in Ships' Rudder Housings

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The Club has been made aware of several cases concerning stowaways hiding in ships' rudder housings (see Loss Prevention News issue 17). The pictures below demonstrate how this ship combatted the problem by welding a gate to prevent access. Although reported successful, this method may not be suitable on ships where the rudder stock requires space for free movement.

The left image where sea water can be seen illustrates the conditions that stowaways would be subject to hiding in this location.


Test & Renewal Dates Painted

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Painting the last renewal/inspection date on deck machinery and other gear often indicates good management of the maintenance schedule onboard. It provides a visual reminder of when renewal and test dates are approaching.
Click on the images above to enlarge these examples.


Emergency Contacts


If you need to call our offices out of hours and at weekends, click After Office hours for a up to date list of the names of the Duty Executives and their mobile phone numbers. 

Ship Finder


This Ship Finder is updated on a daily basis. Members who need to advise the Club of updates to their recorded ships' details should advise their usual underwriting contact.

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